Category Archives for Grassroot Marketing

You are your brand by Eve Vaughn

So you wrote a book. Great. That’s the easy part. Not easy in the sense that you’ve put your blood, sweat and tears into this work, and probably spent countless hours in edits to get it just right. It’s easy because you now have a finished product. The hard part is getting people to read your baby. Writing a book is only part of the job of being an author. Having great marketing tools to push your masterpiece into the hands of eager readers takes as much dedication if not more than actually writing it if you want to make your work a success.

I can’t tell you how many books go unread simply because the author hit the publish button and expected the sales to happen with little to no effort. These aren’t terrible books, in fact, a lot of them are quite good but if an author doesn’t promote their work, the sales will reflect that lack of effort.

For the new author, marketing can seem a bit overwhelming. Purchasing Ads, Blog Tours, sending out ARC’s are just a few ways to promote your book. But one of the easiest and inexpensive ways to advertise your work is creating an online presence. Social media is an author’s best friend. Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Pinterest, to name a few, are platforms where you are not just selling your books, but you are selling you.

Understandably, it’s up to the individual on how much of themselves they’d like to share online. You can be as personal or as private as you’d like. Share a recipe, or a funny story about your kids. Engaging will readers humanizes the person behind the words. One of the things I do is live tweet my favorite shows. Every so often, I’ll receive an email from someone who followed me because of my tweets and they checked out my books. Even when you don’t think about it, people do take notice of your activity on social media. When readers are engaged they are more likely to check out your books, because they enjoy your online personality.

But representing your brand also goes beyond social media. It’s important to maintain an affable, and friendly demeanor in public when you are going under your author name. Conferences, books signings or meet-ups are also great ways to engage readers. We’ve all heard horror stories from fans who have less than favorable encounters with their favorite authors and because of that, they’ve stopped buying books from that person. We also hear about authors who have public melt -downs and some who say problematic things online and because of that, their readership drops.

But the good news is, when you have a positive encounter with a reader, you can make a fan for life.  So keep in mind that you are your brand and one of the most important marketing tools, is you.

The Importance of an Author Mailing List by Mandy Rosko

Okay, so every author worth his or her salt kind of knows this already, so I don’t think I’m going to be telling you anything new here. The point of this post is to convince you to actually get started. Why?

Because apparently I’m not alone as one of the many, many authors out there who, despite knowing how mailing lists are important, despite hearing again and again the complaints of other authors who regret not starting theirs sooner…yeah, I waited a long assed time before starting mine.

I kind of hate that now. Now I’m trying to keep a mindset where I don’t care about sales. I want subscribers first, second and third, and I’ll get to sales fourth.

Now here’s the best bit. I not only waited, but when I actually got started, I just sort of stopped looking at it and let it pitter off when the strategy I was using stopped working, which happened fairly quickly after Amazon started their new bit where a Kindle book will begin at the start of Chapter One, instead of on the cover or title page, allowing readers to see front matter. Same thing for the back matter. The instant someone finished a book, they were immediately taken to a review page instead of being able to look at free offers or a list of other books.

Considering the number of reviews I have, I’m not too sure how well the review page is working, even with my low sales.

But on to business!

Building a mailing list is not only insanely hard, but it can take a good amount of money and patience, because you’re looking at waiting a long time before you see results. A couple of months at the least.

Here’s a snap shot of what my list growth looked like after reading Nick Stephenson’s Reader Magnet Book:

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I first started putting together my mailing list last year at the end of January or February. As you can see, those months are missing so I can’t really show you the growth there, but I still have April. The imports (225 of them) came when I attended Romancing the Capitol, a reader event, and gave away free signed print copies with the expectation that the readers got them by giving me their email addresses and signing up for the list.

I went to that event with no more than 130 books, possibly less, and encouraged people to take doubles for their friends, or themselves since I brought multiple series, or more books in one series. Which means that some people just saw the sign up form and signed up, possibly to feel good about also getting some free swag since I had those on the table as well.

It was awesome 😀

For the rest of April, people who signed up on their own, there were only 41. In May it was 32, and in June it was 21. July was 10. August was 8. Sept was 2. October was 1, and in November it was 7.

Notice that trend?

So here’s the thing I’m going to talk about. This isn’t just about list building and whatnot. It’s also about watching your list. Paying attention to it. Those months went by without me even noticing. Days add up and go by in a blink. I kept meaning to get back to it, but there was always more writing to be done, more edits, things to plan for, birthdays, Christmas, etc.

It wasn’t just that. It was that fact that I had read this book about a system that was supposed to work, but didn’t when Amazon changed how its customers read that was also a downer. I figured I’d get back to it because nothing I did was going to help anyway.

Then December came. Notice the slightly higher tick there? That’s 66 people. That came in when I did a Facebook event with a number of other authors. At the end of December. I think it happened on the 27th or the 28th. Before that bigger chunk, there were maybe 7-10 people who had signed up for the month based on my books and not so great landing page on my website.

When I announced the people at the party could get a free book and I got all those extra sign ups just from that, not giving them an Amazon link where they could buy something, but offering them something for free, I got all those extra people.

One Facebook event, one offer, barely any work on my part, and all those people signed up to hear from me, I was intrigued once more.

So, at that point, with RTC, and Nick Stephenson’s method, I was just under 500 subs. January came, and I’d already heard about another awesome way to get people to sign up for my list based on giveaways thanks to hanging out with the ladies at RAMN.

Instafreebie. I’ll explain that in a bit, but I also went back to Nick Stephenson’s books. I’d heard a couple of things, both good and some lukewarm, but nothing really bad. There was no one out there warning me he was a scammer, so I decided that I didn’t want to bother with all his free videos anymore. I wanted to take the risk and make myself a guinea pig by buying his class when it opened up and getting at some of his other videos.

In January, I started messing with Facebook Ads, advertising my Starter Library this time, not just one free ebook.

Not bad. This time I got 175 sign ups with 2 imports

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Now I was totally starting to get greedy, and it was awesome. I wanted to see if I could do better on the next month, and I did. I used the Facebook ads in combination with another Facebook party, a group Valentines Day sale with 50+ other authors, and a Freebooksy ad to get this:

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KAPOW! 583 sign ups with 8 imports.

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BTW, these imports are coming when people email me saying they’re having trouble getting on the list themselves. I offer to manually sign them up and send them their books, and that’s how that happens. Just be careful that you have clear written permission to do this. People don’t like being signed up for something they don’t want.

Meaning if someone emails me saying “I want free books!” I don’t sign them up. I email them back, saying I can manually put them on the list if they like and send them their library. If they agree, I do it. If they don’t email me back, well I have my answer there, too.

Now back to work. Like I said, most of this is costing me money. The Valentine’s Day sale was free to join. I just had to advertise it to my growing list to qualify 🙂 That added me I think about 125-150 people.

The Freebooksy ad, when I watched it, I’m pretty sure added at least 200 people to the list. It’s hard to make an exact count since I also have people coming in through the Facebook ads, as well as a few trickling in from regular sales. I need to get one of those tracking pixels on my site, another thing that comes highly recommended that I’m still dragging my feet on. You can sort of keep track based on how many clicks you’re getting on your Facebook ad vs. how many you get the day of the Freebooksy ad and author promos, but I’m betting that it’s roughly 200 extra people, give or take a few, over the course of three or four days.

Be careful with Facebook ads and other online advertising spots! Some places I’ve used that I thought would get me major traffic that resulted in little more than a blip. These things will bring you subscribers, but not at the speed you would like or a cost that will keep you happy.

As of this writing, nearly 1AM on March 30th, this is what my Dashboard looks like. The first big spike is the Freebooksy, the second smaller one on the 17th is the St. Patrick’s Day sale with the other authors, and that small green bump at the end was an advertising spot on Fiverr that came highly recommended. I might give it another chance though, just in case there was something I missed when purchasing the ad:

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Update: That last bump at the end was from a Facebook group promoting my permafree dragon romance. Almost a thousand copies in a day is pretty sweet when each of those books has a link inside to get those readers on my newsletter.

With my front and back matter advertising a free starter romance library to people who signed up for my list, these big jumps brought in new subscribers.

To date, here’s what March looks like for subscribers:

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With two days left in the month, that’s 670 new subscribers plus 8 that were imported. I almost have a hundred more people than I did last month.

EDIT: On April 1st, at 2:55 am, that number is now at 730 subscribers. Not bad for the month 😀

3rxbwi

Back to Instafreebie, however. All the people who signed up for my reader list through Instafreebie don’t appear on these graphs. I have no idea why since it’s Mailchimp connected, though they do appear on the monthly list number.

Anyway, here’s how many people have come in from Instafreebie in the three months since I’ve signed up:

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This is from adding a new free book every month for people to choose from, and only those who opt into my mailing list get one, so I’m not sure how this list would have looked had I only used one book for the entire three months, or if I’ll continue to add new books every month. Probably not, as I’m pretty sure I’ll eventually run out, but I have enough of a back list that I can keep on going for a little while longer.

So to recap. At the end of December I had about 485 people on my list after a year. As of this writing, I have 2915 people on my list, just shy of 3000.

I have 29% of my goal of 10K subscribers, and I’m hoping to get that by the end of December if I can keep this momentum up.

Keep in mind this is after buying list building courses that are pretty expensive, and dumping $500 a month into multiple Facebook ads, and trying to get ones that are cheap and effective. I can spend this much because I have a pretty decent savings thanks to my other pseudonym that makes me good money for now, but I keep hearing stories of people who get readers onto their lists by spending only $5 a day on the ads themselves, and getting invited to Facebook Parties. I’ve also had to turn off some of my Facebook ads because Facebook is trying to charge me over a dollar per click. Something I’m not cool with and have been trying to get back down there for the last couple of weeks >.< It’s an expensive experiment when you can’t figure out how to get the cost per click below $0.50

Another expensive thing I did was a giveaway with KingSumo. Even with getting KingSumo on sale for $99, that, plus the cost of the prize still made it pretty expensive. After heavily filtering down the emails, I think in the end I got about 100 people on my list, which puts the cost per subscriber at about $2.20 each. Not too sure how I feel about that, but I’m willing to try again and keep experimenting with it to see what can be improved.

To not end on a downer, keep in mind that being invited to a Facebook party and advertising your list there tends to be free, though you should only do this if you’re actually hosting a spot. Do Not do this if you’re a guest there who is just there to have fun and get some cool free stuff. Also, I pay only $20 a month for Instafreebie. Basically, I got 1153 people on my list from spending $60. Totally worth it. Same thing with Freebooksy. Do that once a month, spend the $125, and if you can get even close to 200 people, then you’re looking at $0.50-0.75 per subscriber. Also worth it. Not everything has to clean out your bank account to be worth it.

I’ve also cleaned some people out of the list who are not active. I’ll have to do that again soon I’m sure. If no one opens a letter from me in 5 months, I can assume they don’t care and get rid of the email. Since I want my open rate and click rates to be high, this is mega important. You pay for the people on your list so make sure you can keep a decent open and click rate.

So here’s the thing, you might not need to buy any expensive training courses, or do the Facebook ads so long as you’re a super cool networker and can get invited to at least one Facebook Party a month and do your own advertising, while making sure your website is as clean as possible and ready to take in more people who want to get your free stuff. Personally, my website landing page still needs major work, too many distractions, but it does still work.

I did need these things. I needed the course to keep me from seeing something shiny and moving on. I’m lazy. I need something to keep me accountable and something for me to keep looking at to see that there’s still a steady improvement. Seeing the number of subscribers go up every day by 15-35 is great. Every time I get another hundred, I do a little happy dance in my chair. Or a silent squeal if I’m in public and don’t want anyone to see. With every thousand, I get a euphoric feeling. I want that to keep on happening.

I have to test out the list a little more, send the people on it some questions to find out if they prefer sales to contests and whatnot, and see how effectively I can sell to them without pissing them off. I’m trying to take it slow by romancing them with my winning personality and free stuff, so I don’t think I’ll have any decent numbers for another few months, though I’m already noticing a small bump in sales whenever I send out an email 🙂

It used to be that I’d be lucky to get a check from Amazon two months in a row. That’s how few books I sold despite having a decent back list size. Now, thanks to the Freebooksy ads, the Valentines and St Patrick’s Day sales, along with sending out my newsletters telling readers about these sales and my preorders, I’ll be getting some checks over the next couple of months.

Nothing too spectacular. This month I’ve so far got another $337 coming my way, which is still awesome, especially with the CAD to USD conversion rate.

That’s enough to pay my Car insurance plus gas and have money left over for me to go shopping with. It’s not what a lot of authors are making, but it’s nothing to sneeze at either. It makes my Facebook ads hurt less in the end, that’s for sure.

Again, it’s still too soon to see how much it will grow, if at all, but it’s kind of interesting that the only time I started making money on my self published stuff was when I stopped caring about sales.

Cheers

~USA Today Bestselling Author Mandy Rosko

So I have to talk to…people?

A Tale of Social Media and Reader Interaction

Social media is a large part of our society these days. As an author, it plays a part in both your personal and business lives. Why? Because social media is where EVERYONE is—friends, family, co-workers, other writers. And most important, readers.

Many of us were readers before we ever sat down to pen our first book. We were inspired by someone, somewhere, to put our ideas on paper and make them into a story that we hope others want to enjoy. While the point of marketing is to expose our brand, there’s more to it than spamming the interwebz with pleas to buy our books.

Think on this – when you’re engaging a person at a conference or wherever, do you want them to walk up to you, stick their hand out and introduce themselves like this? “Hey, I’m T.J. I know you don’t know me but my books are awesome. Here’s a link to go buy them!”

Most likely, you’d look at that person and wonder whether they were off their meds. You don’t greet total strangers like that in person, so why in the world would it be effective online? Sure readers are always looking for great books. But they’re more likely to buy your work if you come off as a person who is approachable, likeable and not a total bitch.

Admit it, there’ve been times where you looked forward to meeting an author at a book signing or a conference, then after finally having a moment to interact, you swore you’d never buy another one of their books again. Like, ever.

So, don’t be “that guy”.

The question is, how do we let our readers know that we’re real people and not just walking promotions? We have to TALK to them.

Here’s a great example of how simply being friendly can gain great relationships with readers.

The following post had about 100 likes, which means the number of people who actually looked at it was much higher:

So later on, when this same author posted about a new book, the engagement DOUBLED:

I also notice that after I’ve been a bit more chatty with people on social media, I get a lot more engagement in my actual promo posts. And the hope is that more engagement will translate in sales.

For example, I had a new release in a KindleWorlds launch, and instead of spamming my book in The Wolf Pack (a popular Facebook group), I talked about shifters in general, other people’s books, things I was interested in (such as big cats) and commented on/liked other people’s posts. I did this for a couple of weeks prior to my own release. I didn’t spend all day on Facebook, but just a few interactions a day.

Along came release week and guess what happened? I received a TON more engagements on both my fun and promo posts than I’d ever received before. Ever. In addition, I received more REVIEWS on Amazon for the book that I was promoting, and a nice number of opening sales for the first two months of the release. In addition, every other book in the series received a sales bump. And the longer I engaged the group in fun stuff, the longer the sales bump continued. It was a totally magical [insert Harry Potter or Lord of the Rings-type music here!] moment and completely worth it.

So, yes. We do need to actually ‘talk’ to people. Share a bit of yourself with your readership. They don’t need to know what blood type you are, or what color panties you wear on Tuesdays. But a little bit of information can go a long way.

So what kind of things should you share? Here are some examples:

  • Are you a Doctor Who fan? Why or why not?
  • If you write paranormal, have you ever been on a ghost hunt?
  • Which paranormal TV shows or movies do you like?
  • For general things, do you enjoy music? If so, what kind?
  • Do you listen to it while you write? Does it inspire any of your stories?
  • Who are your favorite man-candy actors or girl-crush actresses?
  • What do you think about the latest movies that hit the big screen? Love ‘em, hate ‘em, ambivalent or just meh?
  • Did you dress up last Halloween? Really? What did you “go” as?
  • Coffee lover? Chocolate lover? Hate one or both?
  • Are you a proud nerd?
  • Know any good jokes? If not, are you master of the funny meme?

Now, I’m not saying just start spouting all of this information all over the interwebz, but find others who may be talking about some of these things and engage them. Your readers will definitely see it and may even check out some of your interests and begin to talk with you about them.

A little interaction can go a loooong way to building positive social media relationships with people who love your writing. And those people will tell someone else. And they’ll tell two friends, and so on and so on.

Bottom line, if readers like you as a person, they’re more likely to stick with you as an author.

So, go get ‘em tiger!

Love, T.J.

Thinking Outside the Box Set – Creative Author Collaboration

By now, most authors know that multi-author boxed sets of ebooks can be a great way to cross promote and reach new readers. While there still can be a lot of power in a bundle, if done right (in fact, there’s a great article right here about how to do that), the power of the mighty boxed set is beginning to wane.

Luckily, authors (especially indies) have all kinds of other great opportunities to collaborate! Here’s a look at a few creative projects that have come out recently.

SHARED WORLDS

Authors are banding together to write closely-connected stories within the same world. From projects like the Woodland Creek series, where thirty authors coordinated to write paranormal shifter stories set around the same town, all tightly branded and releasing on the same day, to the ambitious 50-title historical western romance project American Mail Order Brides, authors are using the strength of their numbers to make a marketing splash.

SHARED THEMES

Several bestselling romance authors are collaborating to release sexy novellas under the 1001 Dark Nights brand, with great success. And a number of SF and Fantasy authors have put together short story anthologies based around themes or featuring women writers, like the fabulous collection The Dark Beyond the Stars.

SHARED AUDIENCES

Although the above ventures are ambitious, you don’t have to put together a huge project to be successful. Find one or two other authors writing in your subgenre who have a similar career track and goals, and see if you can come up with some interesting ideas. Bestselling western romance writers Deborah Holland and Carolyn Fyffe share the Mail Order Brides of the West series, taking turns releasing books in that sub-series which are tied to their own, individual series. Authors Grace Draven and Elizabeth Hunter have released themed collaborations where they each contribute a novella, and cross-promote to their readers. Beneath a Waning Moon is their most recent duo release.

SHARED PROMOTIONS

Many authors have found that gathering a group of similar authors to share promotions can greatly increase their reach. Whether it’s doing a book giveaway for the holidays or putting together a Facebook reader event, collaborating with others increases the fun, and the potential success, of your project.

CONNECT

The best way to make things happen is to connect with similar authors (the more similar the better in terms of genre and where you are in your careers) and start building connections. Form up or find groups on your social media networks, and start putting ideas out there. Be proactive, fearless, and creative. This is just the tip of the iceberg. There are hundreds of ways to use our power as authors to collaborate and innovate. The next big thing is out there – maybe just waiting for you to invent it!

How to Make Your Boxed Set a Success

Boxed sets are a great way to boost your visibility on ebook retailers and can be a good source of extra income, but what does it take for a boxed set to find success? I’ve been in boxed sets since the beginning and I’ve had flops as well as wild successes. Here’s how to avoid flopping.

 

1.High concept drives sales.

Gone are the days of slapping any ol’ group of stories together. For a boxed set to sell well now, it has to have a hook beyond the fact that it is a 99 cent mega deal. There are enough boxed sets for sale that readers can be picky. Give them a reason to pick yours.

My last boxed set (now unpublished) was a mash-up of the Outlander trend with shifter romance. Titled Highland Shifters, the set hit the USA Today bestseller list and part of its success was due to having a very tight concept that was instantly communicated via the cover.

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New Release Book Marketing Strategies that Work Well

iStock_000002973850XSmallThere are many different ways you can market a new release. These are some of the things that I have found that have worked really well, especially for newer authors whose biggest challenge is usually visibility.

When I first started publishing, almost two years ago, I was fortunate to have some great writing friends who shared what worked for them. One of them, Leighann Dobbs, told me about her .99 release strategy. I have since used this for every book.

Each new book is released at .99 for several days and then goes to its regular $2.99 or $3.99 price. This early release discount is only offered to those on my email list (and is an incentive that helps with signups) and posted on my author page (and boosted to fans and friends).

The reason this can work so well is because you get an initial boost of sales upon release that can shoot you onto your genre top 100 lists (or close to it), which helps with visibility. So then a few days later, when you raise to your regular price, you are probably much higher in ranking than you would have been if you’d released at the regular price. Once you are more established, you could experiment with releasing at regular price, but I have found that the initial .99 release works so well that it’s worth missing some potential full price sales and it also is a really nice way to reward your most loyal readers.

When you are brand new and don’t have a list to email, you may want to consider getting the word out in other ways. When I launched a new pen name, I ran some Facebook ads to a simple landing page that had the book cover and blurb about the coming series and a signup link for an email alert when the book went live, with the incentive to get it at the early release discount. This generated about 150 initial signups over about 3 weeks. I also joined a Facebook group in that genre that was full of readers and where promo was limited to new release or sale announcements.

This group was hugely helpful in establishing early readers. I offered an Advance Readers Copy, to help generate some initial interest and reviews and sent out maybe a dozen. A friend recently followed my example but sent out even more ARCs as that group has grown. It is ideal to join a group like this way in advance of publishing. Get to know the readers and other authors and other opportunities may present themselves. I participated in a group sale, a .99 long weekend promo with about 30 other authors and I timed my new release to hit then.

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Be sure you’re seeing your favorite authors on Facebook

Be sure you’re seeing your favorite authors on Facebook – Since I’m an author, I’ll just use mine as an example, but the steps are the same on any author page.

Facebook is ever-changing and so is the way they show readers who like my Author Page my posts. To be sure you’re being shown my posts (or at least up your chances) be sure to do the following quick steps on Facebook.

1. Go to my Author Page Michelle M. Pillow Author Page on Facebook

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2. Click on the LIKED button up top. You will see a drop down menu that says Get Notifications and Add to Interest Lists. Check both of these. If you already have interest lists set up, add me to the one that works. If not, its easy. Go to step 3 now and I’ll show you how.

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Publishing Checklist

I built this for myself as a checklist for things to make sure and get done with every book release. With everything I’ve learned from this amazing group, I thought a concise list would help me, and then anyone else who wanted to use it, hit as many of the “must do” things before a book releases.

 

Publishing Checklist:

  1. Finish the book.
    1. Put it away for a week, let it rest.
    2. Send to beta readers for feedback
    3. Write Promo
      1. Blurb
      2. Tagline,
      3. Synopsis

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Have readers add your group to their favs

Consider telling your readers how to add your FB Group to their Favorites. Its a great way to be sure you’re reaching them. Free advertising. 🙂

Two ways:

In the group go to Notifications and in the drop down pick favorites.

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Other way: on left side of your FB “stuff” you’ll see Groups. Put cursor over Groups and you’ll see MORE option pop up. Click it. Then to the right of your groups you can add some to your favorites lists
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